Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Alex Making A JAVA Text Adventure / Preparing The Marlin 795



Song:  One Tree Hill

Group:  U2



Alex is working on his own JAVA text adventure.

Along with his game programming...
Alex loves writing novels.

He is starting the last book of his four part story.

Sometimes Alex gets up extra early so he can work on his novel
before his scheduled study time.

Frequently, he will work on his novel or his game programming right after dinner...
and he will often work right up until bedtime.



Alex using the left window for his JAVA coding...
and he then sees the game result in the right window.

Actually...
I told him he is doing things backwards.

Right now he is making up his adventure story in his head as he programs.

I told him that as the adventure grows...
there is no way he will be able to remember all of the details.

I told him that the very first thing he must do is to make his overall story map or board.

We will be getting him a large poster board on which he may lay out his story visually.

His is a medieval era adventure with weapons, deadly traps and mazes...
aggressive minions of all types, heroes and brave comrades with special skills...
such as survival, battle techniques, spells...etc.

The whole story is made on the story map.
This is where his imagination will be put to the test.

The encoding is just the tedious part.

Although Alex has never played the 80s text adventure 'ZORK'...
it will be similar to this...
however, he will incorporate even more complex story lines.

He plans to not only have it an adventure filled with life and death battles...
but one filled with friendship and love...
courage and fear...
of destruction or of a building of a new civilization.

He will have to incorporate alternate paths for each member to take...
which would then lead them onto either, correct paths in life...
ones which lead to lives filled with happiness and a concept of future...
or onto hedonistic lives which are ultimately filled with grief.

This is a long term project which will take much thought
and creativity on his part...
but this is what Alex really loves to do.

I will be teaching him the basic techniques of building a story map...
and of outlining each character and of the basic story lines.

The story maps are often made in reverse order...
from what you wish to end up with...
in all the alternate forms 
(depending on the decisions made by the game player)...
and working one's way to the diverging paths, and finally to the beginning.

Once it is finished...
his game will be a game of life and death...
of glory and deep satisfaction in life...
or of misery and suffering...
depending on the decisions made by the player of the game.

It shall be just as in life.

By taking one of the many paths in life just because it is initially easy or fun...
unhappiness is often the result.

By taking the roads which lead to the fulfillment of long term goals...
life becomes a great adventure.

His game should be a story of true human nature...
as brought to life in a fantasy setting.

Hopefully, he won't lose interest making this text game.

It is a great hobby which can lead to great satisfaction.

As Alex was typing away on his gaming program...
I took out his rifle and started preparing it for what I thought was to be 
a day of shooting in the hills not too far from home on the following day.




Alex's Marlin 795, bipod, and scope
(I always keep his gun locked until we are at our impromptu range...
or during cleaning).


You will notice again...the lock is in place...
making it physically impossible to standard load or fire a cartridge.

I first showed him how to check the firearm to ensure it was not loaded
(even were there a cartridge stuck in the chamber...it still would have been
impossible to have an accidental discharge, as we kept the lock in place 
the whole time we were working on the rifle).


I had Alex loosely mount the scope.


I then had him check the placement of the scope for his scope visual standoff range
to ensure he got a full scope sighting from his normal cheek weld position.

We then slid the scope forwards some and then tightened down the scope rings to the mount.


I had gotten him a 3 x - 9 x variable zoom lighted recticle scope.

There are actually three changeable choices :

Plain black mil dot crosshairs...
variable intensity illuminated red recticle...
or variable intensity illuminated green recticle.

It is all done quickly, and easily, with but a turn of a knob on the mid left side of the scope.


The bipod turned out to be unmountable at this time
 as the adapter was only for a conventionally sling studded or railed weapon.

As Alex's Marlin 795 is a molded stock...
the adapter wouldn't work on it.

I just ordered a barrel clamp-on bipod for prone position shooting.

And I also bought him a telescoping free standing bipod
 for the sitting, kneeling, and standing positions.

However...
I will teach Alex the basic positional stabilization techniques from each position...
the prone, sitting, kneeling, and standing...
without stabilization hardware. 

He will primarily shoot without the bipods to master his own body as he shoots...
however, for very long distances (for a 22LR), the bipods will greatly improve accuracy.


We went to "our" spot in the hills to precisely align the scope recticle
to the bore by laser bore sighting on a target.

We were then going to fine tune accuracy and zero the weapon at 100 yards
(point of impact matched to the center of the recticle).

Although some say for a .22...
one should zero at 50 - 75 yards to prevent overshooting at near ranges.

I say that at anything under 100 yards...
you might as well as use the iron sights.

I want Alex to be able to ring the gongs at 300 yards with the scope and bipod...
and then later...with iron sights without a bipod
(spinning light steel plate targets).

With such a light caliber...
this is no easy feat.

This bullet has considerable drop...
and is greatly affected by wind at these distances.

However, should he be able to develop accuracy at these distances with a 22lr...
he will have the basics to accurately shooting much more powerful cartridges in the future.

The 22lr is popular because the rifle and the ammunition is so inexpensive...
and so, shooting skills may be developed through lots of practice.




Alex putting on his Rattlesnake bite proof chaps.

Shortly afterwards...
this is where things began to fall apart  :(

 I pulled out the laser boresighting cartridge...
and I only then realized I had purchased the wrong cartridge type (online).

My mind had automatically gone to the familiar.

When I was in the ARMY...
I had primarily used the 5.56 mm (.223) cartridge
(secondary cartridges were the 7.62 mm and larger).

I had fired thousands of rounds over the years.

This is what I am used to...
so, what did I do without thinking?

I had ordered the .223 laser boresighting cartridge :(

(the .223 is about the same diameter bullet as a .22LR, but longer and boat tailed...
but has a far...far larger cartridge, essentially making it a super high velocity .22 cal).

When I pulled it from its package in the mountains...
well...I could only think of one thing...
Shiroi...you bonehead!

(As I am writing this...
I have already ordered the correct laser boresight cartridge.
It should arrive in less than a week).

"Ok"... I thought...
"we could still salvage this situation".

We could at least do some rough zeroing at 50 yards.

By the time we had set up the target...
the sun had set.

Of course...
the last time we had gone shooting was in the Summer.

It was still light enough to shoot at 8:30 PM.

It was getting near 6:30 PM when the sun started setting...
and had quickly become too dark to shoot and determine shot placement from even 50 yards.

Of course...
at this point...once again...
I could only think of one thing...
Shiroi...you bonehead




Alex hand holding the laser boresight cartridge on target from a few yards away
(chambered in a stabilized rifle...there would only be one unmoving dot).

In the mountains...
once the sun starts setting...
within a short period of time...
it is dark
(you don't get the residual twilight as you would from a normal horizon).

Before we could retrieve the target, pack up, and leave...
it was already too dark to drive down the dirt path without headlights.

So...
head back we did.

Alex wasn't so disappointed...
he was happy to be able to have more free time at home.

He has a Biology exam coming up...
and he wanted to study some more tonight...
and he then wanted to do more work on his text game  :)





2 comments:

  1. Sounds like quite an elaborate adventure that Alex is coding. I can see that Alex can be a very prolific and creative game programmer.

    ReplyDelete
  2. He enjoys it very much...but I fear he tries to start too many projects all at once. If he finishes this project, it should be a lot of fun to play.

    ReplyDelete

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