Monday, December 2, 2013

Development Of Common Sense III / 11 Pieces Of Wisdom From Bill Gates - Part 6




Song:  Terra's Theme

Performing Artist:  Unknown





This is the sixth article on Bill Gates' 11 rules to school children.


Bill Gates'


Rule #6:  If you mess up, it's not your parent's fault...
so don't whine about your mistakes, learn from them.




My Perspective:



First of all...
we must define the word... mistake.

All too frequently...
people who lie...who cheat...who take a calculated risk, and lose...
those who use deceit...those who steal...all those of evil intent
who get exposed...then announce they had "made a mistake"...
as if it were their "get out of jail free" card.

It is their canned fall back response...
a juvenile attempt at beguilement...
one which is so transparently illogical as to be insulting.
There is a frequent attempt to bolster their ludicrous claim
with an over dramatic flourish of the hands and arms...
along with the rolling of the eyes...
as if it were to indicate complete supplication for an "innocent" act...
instead of their real intent of attempting to establish a false premise...
that of making a simple "mistake"...and therefore...
worthy of complete and immediate forgiveness.


NO


A mistake involves
NO EVIL OR FRAUDULENT INTENT.

A mistake MUST be borne of 
GOOD OR NEUTRAL INTENT.



---------------


For the sake of this article...
lets assume a true mistake had been made...
a simple miscalculation...a miss take of something for another.



Anyone who fears making a simple mistake
so much that they blame someone else who is faultless...
had made one of the biggest false assumptions in their thought process
long before their situational mistake.


In their mind...
they must have thought that they would never make a mistake...
and so, when they do...the burden is so much as to make them
somehow attribute the fault to someone or something else...
or it will make them shy of extending themselves in the future.

Especially as children...
to never make a mistake is to wish to ensconce oneself
in a bubble of surety...
a place where control over everything is assured.

When this happens...
the only thing assured is stagnation.

The opposite thoughts should be in the mind of the child.

Should they be in a position where they are NOT making mistakes...
they have reached a position of mastery...
and should move on to more challenging tasks.

They should STRIVE to challenge themselves at levels which cause failure.

This tells them this is where they need to be
in order to have something to learn.

If they aren't failing...
they haven't left their comfort zone...
and so, will learn nothing.


A child should take great delight in making honest mistakes.

So long as the child knows where the mistake was...
and in how to correct it...
he shall become stronger...
better than ever before.


So...
far from mistakes being something to whine about...
a child who is making no mistakes...
has something to whine about.

It is indicative of stagnation.

It is at this point that the student should complain to his teacher
and inform her that something is very wrong...
for he is making no mistakes!


Once again...
if a child is NOT making mistakes...
he is not being challenged enough.


Now...
this premise is predicated on the mistake being honest...
one where no lack of effort of the child comes into play.


The premise of an honest mistake also rules out 
the negation of specific situational perfection.

Once a child has reached a level of mastery in a particular area...
such as a particular piece of music he had practiced
to the point of automatic muscle memory...
he may expect his subsequent performances 
in that particular piece to be perfect.

So long as he maintains the required amount of practice to maintain perfection...
he may forgive himself the very rare mistake.

However...
should the mistake arise out of a lack of maintenance practice...
or a lack of adequate rest or anything else which would disrupt 
his concentration... he then should be upset with himself...
for it would then not be an honest mistake.

So long as the child then correctly identifies the true problem...
and rectifies it for both, the short term...and the long...
and in the widest possible area of application
(not just for music...but for all his skills)...
he will have grown.


As a general rule...
a child will do best in the long run...
when a mistake is made...
to own up to it...
attempt to rectify it...
and to not make excuses...
but to merely keep his mouth shut...
and to constantly improve himself.

The ability to do this signifies to the employer
that the person has the very valuable attribute 
of being able to roll with the punches...
of being able to adapt to adverse conditions...
of being able to bounce back from emotional hits...
of being able to consistently perform at high levels
regardless of the circumstances.

Does this mean the individual is always wrong
when a mistake is made by him?

NO...
sometimes it is the world which is wrong.


As a golden rule...
in order to correctly rectify a problem...
you must first correctly identify what the problem is.
You must then engineer a correct solution...
as appropriately applied in the real life setting
(factoring in time and the human condition...which are often overlooked).
Then real life run throughs under all foreseeable circumstances must be conducted.


Properly identify...
properly engineer...
properly test.


It is already known that humans are fallible.

Our weakness lies in our inability to maintain absolute focus
on a task for long periods of time...
and in our inability to concentrate on more than one task at a time.

While we may quickly transition between tasks...
when multiple stimuli present themselves in a short period of time...
the person's brain becomes overloaded...
it then freezes or incorrect prioritization of the tasks
often leads to mistakes made.


Where our great strength lies, when given time...
 is in our ability to take into account multiple variables of a problem...
to predict possible outcomes so a properly engineered solution
with multiple redundancies and contingency plans may be formulated
to almost always ensure success.

The problem with this is when through improper engineering...
the human condition is not taken into account.


An example of very good engineering
(although not perfect):

Commercial aircraft multiple redundancy and warning systems.

There are automatic warning systems which alert the pilot
to possible oversights on the pilot's part...
such as incorrect airspeed or angle of attack which could result in a stall.
There are landing gear warnings...fuel usage computers which predict
a possible shortage for the input destination due to unexpected
re-routes or maneuvers...etc.


The human condition and many of its limitations are well known.

Through proper engineering taking these into account...
the fallibilities of humans may be greatly mitigated.


An example of poor engineering:

Many of the pedestrian and auto intersections where
they are forced to occupy the same location...
at the same time...
simply through a lack of foresight.

What is used in some major cities...
is a full auto stop (ALL auto lights red...zero auto movement)...
and then a full pedestrian go 
(all crossings, including diagonal movement...is conducted all at once).

Common sense...yes?

Very few places use this common sense engineering...
especially when the price for mistakes by individuals are so high.

It is easy for cities to blame individual drivers for not seeing
a pedestrian in a cross walk.  But is it right for them to do so...
especially when it happens time and again...and the city
does not prevent it through proper engineering?

Crowded cities are the absolute worst places to have to drive...
especially for people not used to that particular city.

Our brains prioritize visual stimuli by motion, intensity, and frequency.

In a city 
(I had my negative city driving experiences in San Francisco)...
there is a mishmash of stimuli happening at a rapid rate...
there are blinking lights from stores in the same color as the 
traffic lights...and in the same line of sight...
there is the motion of pedestrians which, when they form a group
on the sidewalk which provides the backdrop of those in the crosswalk...
become an undulating mass...instead of one which shows forward motion...
and the people in the crosswalk blend into the background...
there are cars moving in opposing directions and some in oblique directions...
depending on their intentions which many simply do not signify through 
proper signaling.  There are a multitude of signs which are too wordy...
taking at least 4-5 seconds to read...but which must be read in in half that time
due to the rate of traffic (time not factored in)...and there are so many 
exceptions to the rules...many of which are not introduced until the last moment
(oh...I am sorry...you may ONLY turn here from 5:00 pm to 7:00 PM
with the exception of Weekends.  Surprise!  Or a one way street for a portion of it...
then it is not!  Surprise!.  Some right turns are arrow controlled...some are not...
some merely have a sign telling you of a change of rules and when they apply...etc).

  Now couple this with multiple double parkings...
people darting out in the middle of a block from between cars...
then coming up to an intersection where cars and people must cross at the same time...
where motion is present everywhere at once...
where light frequency and intensity is not prioritized to the side of safety...
well, bicyclists and pedestrians get injured and killed everyday in 
this nation because of a lack of proper engineering.


When a system works against human nature...
works against our common weaknesses in how our brain operates...
and when there is a lapse of the higher level of concentration
demanded of each individual along with the quantity of stimuli each must
process in a short amount of time for the system to properly function....
well...
the real fault then lies with the system.


While this may seem to go counter to rule #6...

NO.


It says, "If YOU mess up..."


I don't believe this rule means for a child to be a doormat...
to accept any and all blame that is not rightfully his.


As I have said before...
ALL people respect intelligence.

So long as a correction is made in a rational and respectful manner...
while many will not immediately accept it due to THEIR egos...
and due to their stupid fear of losing face...
they do respect the person making the correction.

They will be more careful in the future...
and in the long run...the person will fare better.

He will not be marked as someone who is to be 
taken advantage of...someone who will become the scapegoat.

His intelligence and strong will shall make him an unknown...
and uncontrollable variable...
one whom the predators of society always respect...
and so often...fear.


The development of common sense demands that 
correct correlations are seen...
and correct causations are attributed to them...if applicable.

With this...
problems are correctly identified...
 correct solutions are applied
and then are correctly verified.









No comments:

Post a Comment

Please feel free to comment on this article.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...